Check out Our New Shirts (and Flash Sale!)

It’s always such a thrill to see folks rockin’ NutritionFacts.org apparel. Anyone who comes to my talks wearing any of our stuff gets to cut straight to the front of the book-signing line! That may not sound like a big deal, but if you’ve been to one of my speaking events you know they can go for 4+ hours. I never leave until every book is signed, every picture is taken, every question answered. I’m mostly hunkered down this year writing, but I would never miss the International Plant-Based Nutrition Healthcare Conference (this September in San Diego) or the Lifestyle Medicine Conference (this October in Indianapolis). 

We’re proud to announce a new slew of t-shirt designs (thanks to Bryan Elliott, our Graphic Design Assistant). You’ll never forget the Daily Dozen checklist when you’re wearing it! We’re celebrating these new items with a flash sale. From today through July 31st, get our new merch for 15% off of the regular price. Check out all of the designs and colors here

Of course, all proceeds from the store go to keeping NutritionFacts.org going and growing. 

 

Best Choices for Greens

Dark green leafy vegetables are hands down the single healthiest food on the planet. Mounting evidence suggests it’s possible to overdo a few types, though. If you’re eating regular boring amounts of greens (like a serving a day) then it doesn’t matter which kind you choose. But if you follow my Daily Dozen recommendation to ideally pack in cups a day, I urge you to choose low-oxalate greens, meaning basically any greens other than spinach, chard, and beet greens. All three of those greens are super healthy and I continue to relish all of them, but when I’m shooting for my personal pound-a-day green leafy quota, I now stick to mostly kale, collards, arugula, and bok choy (mustard greens and watercress are also A-OK in huge amounts). The concern with overdoing spinach, chard, and beet greens has to do with the risk of developing kidney stones. I already have videos about preventing and treating kidney stones with diet, but this is a new twist. I’m going to be doing a series of videos about this with all the juicy details, but just wanted to give everyone a heads up.

 

Welcome, Lauren!

Lauren Belyeu is the newest member of the NutritionFacts.org team—she scored our new Digital Outreach Manager position. We’re so excited for her to bring her 8 years of experience in online promotion to bear in the evidence-based nutrition revolution. She also has an interest in nutrition research and is excited to be able to join these passions as part of the NutritionFacts.org team. She is an outdoor, travel, and animal-lover who actually spent most of her life in Cape Town, South Africa, but has lived in South Korea and now lives in Northern Virginia with her fiancé. For our entire existence the millions of people we’ve reached has nearly all just been through word-of-mouth. But access to this life-and-death information is just too important to be left to chance, so we’re really excited to see what Lauren can do to help spread the good news about the tremendous power we have over our health destiny and longevity at the end of our forks.

 

How Not to Die in Medical School

When How Not to Die was published, UWS became the first medical school to use it as a textbook for their first-year medical students, thanks to the vision of Assistant Dean for Medical Education Dr. Louise Muscato. I’m told the program has been a big success and they’ve continued to teach How Not to Die in their classrooms. Times they are a-changin’!

 

Important Survey for Doctors*

Last chance: If you’re an MD or DO in private practice, pretty please click here and take a few minutes to complete the survey to help the game-changing American College of Lifestyle Medicine revolutionize the practice of medicine.

*Note the survey needs to be completed by July 29th.

 

Live Q&A Today

Every month now I do Q&As live from my treadmill, and today is the day.

  • Facebook Live: At 1:00 p.m. ET TODAY go to our Facebook page to watch live and ask questions.
  • YouTube Live Stream: At 2:00 p.m. ET TODAY go here to watch live and ask even more questions! 

You can now find links to all of my past live YouTube and Facebook Q&As right here on NutritionFacts.org. If that’s not enough, remember I have an audio podcast to keep you company at http://nutritionfacts.org/audio.

In health,

Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live, year-in-review presentations: