Saffron for Erectile Dysfunction

What are the effects of both oral and topical application of the spice saffron for impotence in men?

“Saffron has traditionally been considered an aphrodisiac.” The spice has been shown to improve Prozac-induced sexual dysfunction in women and men, significantly improving erectile function. If it works for drug-induced dysfunction, might it also work for just regular erectile dysfunction? This is the topic of my video Saffron for Erectile Dysfunction.

Why not just use pills like Viagra? They can work, but many men stop using them for “various reasons such as adverse side-effects.” In fact, nearly half of men decide the cons outweigh the pros. For men who don’t like drugs, there’s always surgery—the implantation of penile prosthetics. Unbelievably, penile implant usage evidently dates back to the 16th century. Early experiments involved transplanting patients’ rib cartilage or even their actual rib into their penis. Thankfully, space-age technologies in the 1960s allowed men to keep their ribcages intact. Originally, the implants left men in a “permanently erect state,” but then the “Flexirod” was invented with a hinge in the middle so the device could be bent down in half “for improved concealment.” Of course, proper sizing is important: If the implants are too small, there can be drooping at the tip, leading to a “supersonic transport (SST) deformity.” Why supersonic? “Because of its resemblance to the nose of the Concorde [jet]. Overlong prostheses can also be a problem, and with the semi-rigid rods erosion [out of the penis] can occur.” “Although a penile prothesis generally perforates into the urethra, it can also extrude through the glans [tip] or corporeal shaft.” Ouch.

Now, there are inflatable devices, as you can see at 2:06 in my video, and, perhaps one day, there will be “expandable foams that respond to external magnetic fields” or metal-mesh technology “that could expand and retract in a cage-like fashion.” (Can you imagine trying to get through airport security with that?)

There’s got to be a better way.

In one study, twenty men with erectile dysfunction took 200 mg (about a quarter teaspoon) of saffron a day and were followed for ten days. But first, they were brought into the “RigiScan room,” where they were hooked up to a “computer-controlled, battery-powered system for recording of penile tumescence”—meaning swelling—“and rigidity.” They were then “monitored while watching a visual sexual stimulation (VSS) video tape,” though use of the device is controversial, described as an “expensive, complicated, and time-consuming effort.” But, as you can see at 3:00 in my video, after the ten days of taking saffron, there did appear to be a significant improvement in tip and base rigidity and tumescence. “Whether it is possible to replace [Viagra-type drugs] with this golden plant requires further research with a bigger sample size.” But it’s not just size that matters. The researchers didn’t use a control, so all of this could have just been one big placebo effect.

Finally, though, researchers pitted saffron against Viagra in a head-to-head challenge. Normally there’s a third group—a placebo group—as well, but evidently, they felt it would be unethical to let men go 12 weeks without an effective treatment. The saffron appeared safer than the drug, with significantly fewer side effects like severe headaches, hot flushes, nasal congestion, and nausea, but…it was not effective at all. That’s why I never produced a video on the subject—it just doesn’t seem to help erectile dysfunction. Could it be, though, that they made the mistake of taking the saffron orally, as opposed to rubbing it on their penis? About half of middle-aged men in the United States appear to suffer from erectile dysfunction, so how about a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Researchers studied the effects of a gel containing either 1 percent saffron or a “golden yellow food color” so the two gels looked the same. “Both groups were trained to rub a pea-sized amount of the gel on their penis half an hour before a sexual intercourse. One month later, all patients were reassessed using the same questionnaire.” As you can see at 4:40 in my video, compared to the food-coloring gel, the saffron gel led to significant improvements in erectile function, sexual desire, and overall satisfaction. The effects are attributed to a compound in saffron that enhances nitric oxide production in the arteries. But, if that’s the case, then it’s probably better to treat the cause and prevent the vascular dysfunction in the first place by eating a diet packed with nitrate-rich vegetables.

Those who want to clean out all their arteries and treat the cause may want to check out my video Survival of the Firmest: Erectile Dysfunction and Death.


Another video worth watching is Best Food for Antidepressant-Induced Sexual Dysfunction. I have a few others on the golden spice:

In health,

Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live presentations:

Consequences of Prostate Cancer Treatment

A cancer diagnosis is seen as a teachable moment in medicine where we can try to get people to eat healthier, but “research has suggested that male cancer patients may be reluctant to introduce dietary modification…This has been attributed to dietary modifications often being viewed as mimicking “feminine” eating behaviours, such as emphasizing an increase in fruit and vegetables.” 

As I discuss in my video Changing a Man’s Diet After a Prostate Cancer Diagnosis, “[a]lthough healthy eating might enhance long-term survival, few men with prostate cancer make diet changes to advance their well-being.” Many of the cancer survival trials require adherence to strict plant-based diets, and though researchers tried providing extensive nutrition education and counseling programs, dietary adherence was still a challenge.

Apparently the way Dean Ornish was able to reverse the progression of prostate cancer with a plant-based diet was by home-delivering prepared meals to the subjects’ doors, figuring men are so lazy they’ll just eat whatever’s put in front of them. After all, male culture tends to encourage men to drink beer and eat convenience food and meat.

Take Men’s Health magazine, for example. Included in the list of things men should never apologize for were liking McDonald’s, not offering a vegetarian alternative, and laughing at people who eat trail mix. The magazine features articles with such titles as “Vegetables Are for Girls” and sections like “Men and Meat: There’s Only One Kind of Flesh We Like Better and Even Then She’d Better Know How to Grill.”

To appeal to male sensibilities, doctors are advised to use ‘body as machine’ metaphors, framing “men’s health in terms of mechanical objects, such as cars, requiring tuning.” But if men are so concerned about their masculinity and manhood, maybe we instead should share a bit about what prostate cancer treatment entails. The prostate is situated at the base of the penis, so when you core it out with a radical prostatectomy, you lose about an inch off your penis, if it gets erect at all. Only 16 percent of men undergoing the procedure will regain their pre-surgery level of erectile functioning.

Patients are typically quoted erectile dysfunction rates around 60 to 70 percent, but studies have generally considered erectile function recovery “as the ability to maintain an erection hard enough for penetration about 50% of the time…” So, occasionally being able to get an erection is considered recovery, but when a surgeon tells patients they will recover function, the patients probably assume that means the kind of function they had prior to surgery, which only happens 16 percent of the time and only 4 percent of the time in men over 60. Only 1 in 25 gets his baseline sexual function back.

Erections aren’t the only issue. Patients experience other problems like orgasm-associated pain even years later and urinary incontinence during foreplay, stimulation, or orgasm. The vast majority of couples overestimate how much function they’re going to recover. Couples reported feeling loss and grief. Having cancer is bad enough without the additional losses. You’d think that would be enough to motivate men to improve their diets, but almost a fourth of the men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer state they would prefer to have their lives cut short rather than live with a diet that prohibits beef and pork. More men would rather be impotent than improve their diet. It appears pleasures of the flesh may sometimes even trump pleasures of the flesh.


Did I say reverse the progression of cancer? See Cancer Reversal Through Diet? and my overview video How Not to Die from Cancer.

For more on prostate cancer prevention and survival, check out:

Interested in more information on maintaining male sexual function? See:

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live, year-in-review presentations:

Concerns About Bone Broth

There are toxicological issues associated with production and processing of meat, such as the presence of various toxic contaminants—from dioxins and PCBs to cooked meat carcinogens. Carcinogenesis, the development of cancer, may be the main concern, but there are a number of other toxic responses connected with the consumption of meat products. Lead, for example, can be toxic to the nerves, gastrointestinal tract, bone marrow, and kidneys.

Where is lead found in the food supply? In general terms, the highest levels of lead, as well as arsenic and mercury, are found in fish. Sardines have the most arsenic, but tuna may have sardines beat when it comes to mercury and lead.

The problem is that “fish-consumption advisories related to human health protection do not consider the fish by-products fed to farmed animals,” like farmed fish. If some tilapia are fed tuna by-products, they could bioaccumulate heavy metals and pass them onto us when we eat them. Researchers found the highest levels in frozen sole fillets, averaging above the legal limit for lead.

Lead exposure has been shown to have adverse effects on nearly every organ system in the body. Symptoms of chronic exposure range from memory loss and constipation to impotence and depression. These symptoms present after pretty hefty exposure, though. However, we now know that “[b]lood lead levels in the range currently considered acceptable are associated with increased prevalence of gout and hyperuricemia” (elevated levels of uric acid in the blood). According to the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization, a blood lead level needs to be less than 25 micrograms per deciliter to be “non-elevated.” You’d assume that at values under 25, there’d be no relationship with health outcomes, but even throughout this “acceptable” range, lower lead means lower uric acid levels and lower gout risk. So, even blood lead levels 20 times below the acceptable level can be associated with increased prevalence of gout. “These data suggest that there is no such thing as a ‘safe’ level of exposure to lead.” 

Once lead gets into the body, it tends to stay in the body. It builds up in the bones such that it may take 30 years just to get rid of half. The best strategy? Don’t get exposed in the first place.

If lead builds up in bones, though, what about boiling bones for broth? As I discuss in my video Lead Contamination in Bone Broth, we know bones sequester lead, which can then leach from the bones. So, researchers suggested that “the bones of farmyard animals will sequester lead, some of which will then be released into broth during its preparation.” Who eats bone broth? Bone broth consumption is encouraged by many advocates of the paleo diet. Online, you can learn all about purported “benefits” of bone broth, but what they don’t tend to mention is the theoretical risk of lead contamination—or at least it was theoretical until now. Broth made from chicken bones was to have markedly high lead concentrations, up to a ten-fold increase in lead. Researchers concluded, “In view of the dangers of lead consumption to the human body, we recommend that doctors and nutritionists take the risk of lead contamination into consideration when advising patients about bone broth diets.”

But what if you only use bones from organic, free-range chickens? They did use only bones from organic, free-range chickens.


For more on the paleo diet, see:

Other products contaminated with lead include Ayurvedic supplements, protein powders, wild animals shot with lead ammunition, dairy products, and tea from China:

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live, year-in-review presentations: