Dairy Industry Responds to Bovine Leukemia Virus in Breast Cancer

What was the response to the revelation that as many as 37 percent of breast cancer cases may be attributed to exposure to bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a cancer-causing cow virus found in the milk of nearly every dairy herd in the United States? I discuss this issue in my video Industry Response to Bovine Leukemia Virus in Breast Cancer. The industry pointed out that some women without breast cancer harbored the virus, too. Indeed, BLV was found in the tissues of 29 percent of women who didn’t have breast cancer, a finding the researchers replied “is not surprising considering the long latency period of breast cancer…” In other words, they may not have breast cancer yet.

It can take decades before a breast tumor can be picked up on mammography. So, even though people may be harboring this virus in their breast and feeling perfectly fine, the cancer may still be on its way. That’s how other cancer-causing deltaretroviruses appear to work. These viruses can make proteins that interfere with our DNA repair mechanisms. Infected cells are then more susceptible to carcinogens and slowly accumulate mutations over time. “Therefore, evidence of BLV in normal breast tissues prior to premalignant and malignant changes would be expected.” This pattern is what we see with cervical cancer, “in which the causative virus (HPV) is found not only in the malignant [cancerous] tissue, but also in premalignant dysplastic areas [the precancerous tissue] and in normal tissue adjacent to the malignant tumor.”

If BLV, a retrovirus, is really causing thousands of cases of breast cancer every year, wouldn’t some of the anti-retroviral therapies like some of the AIDS drugs be able to counter it? Perhaps, but it’s best not to get infected in the first place.

However, the agriculture industry appeared to be more concerned about consumer confidence in U.S. dairy than consumer cancer. Indeed, the “U.S. dairy industry face[d] a brewing public-relations brouhaha,” and it became “concerned about the possibility of eventual mandatory control of these diseases in dairy cattle along with public perception and an impact on the consumption of dairy products.” What would control look like? BLV is a blood-borne virus, but how is it spread? Is Bessie sharing dirty needles? In a sense, yes: “[B]lood (and BLV virus) is readily spread from animal to animal with blood contaminated needles and/or syringes, obstetrical sleeves, saw or gouge dehorners, tattoo pliers, ear taggers, hoof knives, nose tongs,” and other instruments that aren’t disinfected between animals. So, for example, when farmers are gouging or sawing at the cows’ heads during dehorning, “they are likely to drive blood into the next animal during the subsequent dehorning process.” Or, when they’re sticking their arms into cows’ rectums for artificial insemination, it’s not uncommon for there to be rectal bleeding—then they just go from one cow to the next.

More than 20 countries have successfully eradicated BLV from their herds by changing their practices, whereas it remains an epidemic in the United States in part because we’re not cleaning and disinfecting blood-contaminated equipment for things like “supernumerary teat removal,” which is done because “the presence of extra teats detracts from the beauty of the cow.” Supernumerary teats are removed by pulling them from the udder and cutting them off with a pair of scissors. Those scissors had better be clean—otherwise they could spread BLV from calf to calf and ultimately to someone’s breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Of course, we could just not slice off their teats at all, but then how would we “improve udder appearance?”


Up to 37 percent of breast cancer cases are attributable to exposure to bovine leukemia virus? See my video The Role of Bovine Leukemia Virus in Breast Cancer and its prequel, Is Bovine Leukemia Virus in Milk Infectious?.

The meat and dairy industries’ intransigence in the face of a human health threat reminds me of the antibiotics and steroids issues—continuing to place the public at risk to save a few bucks. See, for example, Antibiotics: Agribusinesses’ Pound of Flesh and Zeranol Use in Meat and Breast Cancer.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live, year-in-review presentations:

A highly effective, cheap, easy-to-use, safer treatment for heavy periods

Ginger is most famous for its role in preventing and alleviating nausea and vomiting. There are now so many studies that there are reviews of reviews. Just a half teaspoon of powdered ginger “is associated with a 5-fold likelihood of improvement” in morning sickness in early pregnancy. (See my video Natural Treatments for Morning Sickness for more on this.) Ginger has also been shown to help with motion sickness, improve postoperative nausea and vomiting, prevent antiretroviral-induced nausea and vomiting during HIV treatment, and was said to be a “miracle” against chemotherapy-induced vomiting.

In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of ginger for breast cancer chemotherapy, chemo-induced vomiting was relieved in all phases—the acute phase within 24 hours of the chemo, two to three days after, and even before chemo sessions with what’s known as anticipatory vomiting. (After a few chemo treatments, the body knows what’s coming and starts throwing up at just the thought of the next session.) Anticipatory nausea can’t seem to be controlled by drugs, even the fancy new ones that can cost 10,000 times more than ginger, which comes in at about two pennies per dose and may work even better in some ways.

Ginger can also help with pain. One-eighth of a teaspoon of powdered ginger, which costs just one penny, was found to work as well as the migraine headache drug Imitrex, without the side effects. (See my video Ginger for Migraines for more.)

Speaking of pain, my video Ginger for Nausea, Menstrual Cramps, and Irritable Bowel Syndrome discusses that it may also be as effective as ibuprofen for alleviating menstrual cramps. Painful periods are exceedingly common and can sometimes cause severe suffering yet have been “virtually ignored” by pain management researchers and practitioners. Four randomized controlled trials, however, have been published on ginger for menstrual pain, and all four showed significant benefit when ginger was taken during the first few days of periods. Effective doses ranged from about a third of a teaspoon a day to a full teaspoon a day, but because they all seemed to work, one might as well start out with the penny-a-day dose.

As a side benefit, ginger can dramatically reduce heavy flow, which is one of the most common gynecological problems for young women. We know there are pro-inflammatory foods that may contribute to heavy menstrual bleeding, so how about trying an anti-inflammatory food like ginger? Heavy menstrual bleeding is defined as more than a third of a cup (80 milliliters), but all the study subjects started out much higher than that. Just an eighth teaspoon of powdered ginger three times a day starting the day before their period cut their flow in half, and it seemed to work better each month they tried it, providing a highly effective, cheap, easy-to-use, safer treatment for menstrual blood loss and pain.

So, ginger works for migraines and menstrual cramps, but just because it may be effective for many types of pain doesn’t mean it’s necessarily efficacious for all pain. For example, what about intestinal cramps? Is ginger effective for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)? The answer is yes, dropping IBS severity by more than 25 percent. But, so did the placebo. So, the real answer is no—it is not effective for the treatment of IBS, yet “[g]inger is one of the most commonly used herbal medicines for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).” Silly people, don’t they know it doesn’t work any better than a sugar pill? Or, from another perspective, are they smart for using something that offers relief 53 percent of the time and doesn’t risk the adverse effects of some of the drugs with which doctors may harm one person for every three they help?


If placebos are so safe and effective, should doctors prescribe them? I discuss the pros and cons in The Lie That Heals: Should Doctors Give Placebos?.

What does work for IBS? See my videos:

What else can women do to make their periods more tolerable? See:

For more on ginger, check out:

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live, year-in-review presentations: