How to Make Your Own CoQ10

Chlorophyll is the green pigment that makes green leaves green. If you search for chlorophyll in the medical literature, a lot of what you find is about fecal fluorescence, a way to detect the contamination of carcasses in the slaughterhouse with feces to reduce the risk of food poisoning from pathogens harbored within animal feces. Fecal matter gets on meat either “with knife entry through the hide into the carcass, and also splash back and aerosol [airborne] deposition of fecal matter during hide removal”—that is, when they’re peeling off the skin. If, however, the animals have been eating grass, you can pick up the poo with a black light. As you can see in my video How to Regenerate Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) Naturally, a solution of chlorophyll is green, but, under a UV light, it lights up as red. So, if you have a black light in a chicken slaughter plant, you can get a drop on the droppings. The problem is most chickens aren’t outside anymore. They’re no longer pecking at grass so there’s less fecal fluorescence. We could let them run around outside or we could save money by just adding a chlorophyll supplement to their feed so we can better “identify areas of gut-spill contamination” on the meat.

The reason I was looking up chlorophyll was to follow-up on the data I presented in my Eating Green to Prevent Cancer video, which suggests that chlorophyll may be able to block carcinogens. I found a few in vitro studies on the potential anti-inflammatory effects of chlorophyll. After all, green leaves have long been used to treat inflammation, so anti-inflammatory properties of chlorophyll and their break-down products after digestion were put to the test. And, indeed, they may represent “valuable and abundantly available anti-inflammatory agents.” Maybe that’s one reason why cruciferous vegetables, like kale and collard greens, are associated with decreased markers of inflammation.

In a petri dish, for example, if you lay down a layer of arterial lining cells, more inflammatory immune cells stick to them after you stimulate them with a toxic substance. We can bring down that inflammation with the anti-inflammatory drug aspirin or, even more so, by just dripping on some chlorophyll. Perhaps that’s one of the reasons kale consumers appear to live longer lives.

As interesting as I found that study to be, this next study blew my mind. The most abundant energy source on this planet is sunlight. However, only plants are able to use it directly—or so we thought. After eating plants, animals have chlorophyll in them, too, so might we also be able to derive energy directly from sunlight? Well, first of all, light can’t get through our skin, right? Wrong. This was demonstrated by century-old science—and every kid who’s ever shined a flashlight through her or his fingers, showing that the red wavelengths do get through. In fact, if you step outside on a sunny day, there’s enough light penetrating your skull and going through to your brain that you could read a book in there. Okay, so our internal organs are bathed in sunlight, and when we eat green leafy vegetables, the absorbed chlorophyll in our body does actually appear to produce cellular energy. But, unless we eat so many greens we turn green ourselves, the energy produced is probably negligible.

However, light-activated chlorophyll inside our body may help regenerate Coenzyme Q10. CoQ10 is an antioxidant our body basically makes from scratch using the same enzyme we use to make cholesterol—that is, the same enzyme that’s blocked by cholesterol-lowering statin drugs. So, if CoQ10 production gets caught in the crossfire, then maybe that explains why statins increase our risk of diabetes—namely, by accidently also reducing CoQ10 levels in a friendly-fire type of event. Maybe that’s why statins can lead to muscle breakdown. Given that, should statin users take CoQ10 supplements? No, they should sufficiently improve their diets to stop taking drugs that muck with their biochemistry! By doing so—by eating more plant-based chlorophyll-rich diets—you may best maintain your levels of active CoQ10, also known as ubiquinol. “However, when ubiquinol is used as an antioxidant, it is oxidized to ubiquinone. To act as an effective antioxidant, the body must regenerate ubiquinol from ubiquinone,” perhaps by using dietary chlorophyll metabolites and light.

Researchers exposed some ubiquinone and chlorophyll metabolites to the kind of light that makes it into our bloodstream. Poof! CoQ10 was reborn. But, without the chlorophyll or the light, nothing happened. By going outside we get light and, if we’re eating our veggies, chlorophyll, so maybe that’s how we maintain such high levels of CoQ10 in our bloodstream. Perhaps this explains why dark green leafy vegetables are so good for us. We know sun exposure can be good for us and that eating greens can be good for us. “These benefits are commonly attributed to an increase in vitamin D from sunlight exposure and consumption of antioxidants from green vegetables”—but is it possible that these explanations might be incomplete?


This blog post has it all: a mind-blowing mechanism, practical applicability, and poop. What more could you want?

Interested in learning more about the potential downsides of cholesterol-lowering statin drugs? I’ve produced other videos on the topic, including Statin Cholesterol Drugs and Invasive Breast Cancer and The Actual Benefit of Diet vs. Drugs.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live, year-in-review presentations:

What to Eat to Boost Immunity

What we eat—or don’t eat—can affect our immune system. In my video Using the Produce Aisle to Boost Immune Function I profile a study conducted to determine the effect of the consumption of brightly colored vegetables on the immune system. For the first two weeks, the subjects ate basically no fruits and veggies. Then, they drank one and a half cups of tomato juice every day for two weeks, followed by two weeks of carrot juice, and then two weeks of spinach powder. Within just two weeks of a fruit- and veggie-deficient diet, immune function plummeted. However, just one and a half cups of tomato juice a day brought subjects back from the ashes. It didn’t take five servings a day—just one tall glass of tomato juice produced results. The carrot juice alone didn’t seem to help as well, however, nor did the powder equivalent of about one serving of spinach. This tells me two things: how remarkably we can affect our immune function with simple dietary decisions and, not all veggies are alike.

When this study was repeated looking at other immune markers, the tomato versus carrot appeared more evenly matched. There is one family of vegetables, however, that we definitely don’t want to miss out on. Inflammation and leaky gut can occur all because of an absence in our diet of AHR ligands—in other words, cruciferous vegetables, including cabbage, collards, cauliflower, kale, Brussels sprouts, and broccoli.

Do people who eat healthier actually get sick less? Those who eat more fruits and vegetables appear to have a lower risk of getting an upper respiratory tract infection like the common cold, whether they’re otherwise vegetarian or not. Even just one added apple a day may help keep the doctor away. The common cold is usually so innocuous, though, so why not test against something stronger?

Researchers have also looked at more serious respiratory infections like influenza. Studying the relationship between various risk factors and influenza-related hospitalizations in the United States, they found that a 5 percent increase in the prevalence of obesity was associated with a 6 percent increase in hospitalization rate. Physical inactivity had worse outcomes, resulting in a 7 percent increase in hospitalizations. Low fruit and vegetable consumption, however, had the most impact, increasing flu-related hospitalization rates by 8 percent.

The common cold isn’t always innocuous, though. For instance, a cold during the first trimester of pregnancy is associated with a number of birth defects, including anencephaly, one of the worst, which causes a fatal malformation of the brain. More recent data suggest that the cold-related fever is the real culprit, as anti-fever drugs appear able to prevent the possible birth defects caused by the common cold.

It’s best, of course, not to get sick in the first place. One thousand women and their diets were followed before and during pregnancy. It was found that “[w]omen who consume more fruits and vegetables have a moderate reduction in risk of [upper respiratory tract infection] during pregnancy, and this benefit appears to be derived from both fruits and vegetables instead of either alone.” Whole fruits and vegetables provide a natural balance of all sorts of things that may improve our immune function in a “complementary, combined or synergistic manner that could account for the protective effect observed from high consumption of both fruits and vegetables”—or maybe that’s the only way they got enough in their diet. The women who appeared protected in this study were eating nearly nine servings of fruits and vegetables a day, compared with only five servings of fruits or four of veggies. This suggests that the arbitrary five- or six-a-day minimum may be insufficient for effective immune function.

For example, in one famous study, elderly individuals were randomized into groups that ate either five servings of fruit and veggies a day or two servings a day. The five-a-day group showed an 80 percent improved antibody response to their pneumonia vaccination compared to the two-a-day group. Even though only about 30 percent (12 out of 40 people) of the five-a-day group reached their target levels of servings, they still did six times better than the two-a-day group. But maybe eight, nine, or ten servings a day would have worked even better.


Need a reminder about what those protective Ah receptors are? See The Broccoli Receptor: Our First Line of Defense and Counteracting the Effects of Dioxins Through Diet.

What’s the best way to prepare broccoli? Check out these videos:

In late pregnancy, however, women can overdo it. See Caution: Anti-Inflammatory Foods in the Third Trimester.

What else can we do to lower our risk of upper respiratory tract infections? See:

Also be sure to check out my video, Are Happier People Actually Healthier?, which compares people’s resistance to having the common cold virus dripped into their nostrils.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live, year-in-review presentations: